Farragut's Fleet

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 17, 1862

This site features the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. This research resource will yield new insights into this important part of American History.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Rebel Soldiers

Rebel Soldiers

Censorship

Censorship

New Orleans

Surrender of New Orleans

David Farragut

David Farragut

Virginia Map

Map of Virginia

Faragut's Fleet

Farragut's Fleet

Fort Macon

Capture of Fort Macon

Belle Reynolds

Belle Reynolds

Cavalry Charge

Cavalry Charge

Fort Macon

Battle of Fort Macon

Farragut's Ships

Commodore Farragut's Ships

Secession Cartoon

Secession Cartoon

 

 

 

MAY 17, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

311

PICKETS CONVERSING BEFORE YORKTOWN—A COMMON SCENE.—SKETCHED BY MR. MEAD OF THE VERMONT BRIGADE.—[SEE PAGE 315.]

OUR FLEET IN THE MISSISSIPPI.

OUR correspondent with Commodore Farragut's fleet in the Mississippi sends us a large picture of the entrance of that fleet into the river, which we reproduce on pages 312 and 313. It will give the beholder some idea of the strength of the expedition—the largest, it is believed, ever collected under our flag. Our correspondent enumerates the feet as follows:

Flag-ship Hartford, twenty-six guns, Captain Richard Wainwright; Executive officer, Lieutenant J. S. Thornton. Steam sloop Brooklyn, twenty-six guns, Captain Thomas T. Craven; Executive officer, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry.

Steam sloop Richmond, twenty-eight guns, Captain James Alden.

Steam sloop Mississippi, sixteen guns, Captain M. Smith; Executive officer, Lieutenant Dewey.

Steam sloop Varuna, ten guns, Captain Charles S. Boggs. Steam sloop Pensacola, twenty-four guns, Captain Henry W. Morris; Executive officer, Lieutenant Francis Roe. Steam sloop Oneida, eleven guns, Commander S. Phillips Lee; Executive officer, Lieutenant Sicord.

Steam sloop Iroquois, nine guns, Commander John De Camp; Executive officer, David B. Harmony.

Gun-boat Westfield, six guns, Captain William B. Renshaw.

Gun-boat Katahdin, six guns, Lieutenant Commanding George Preble.

Gun-boat Pinola, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding Crosby.

Gun-boat Cayuga, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding Napoleon Harrison. Gun-boat Clifton, five guns.

Gun-boat Itasca, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding C. H. B. Caldwell.

Gun-boat Kennebec, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding John Russell.

Gun-boat Kanawha, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding John Febiger.

Gun-boat Sciota, six guns, Lieutenant Commanding Edward Donaldson.

Gun-boat Miami, six guns, Lieutenant Commanding A. D. Harrell.

Gun-boat Owasco, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding John Guest.

Gun-boat Winona, four guns, Lieutenant Commanding Edward T. Nichols; Executive officer, John G. Walker. Gun-boat Wissahickon, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding Albert N. Smith.

Gun-boat Kineo, five guns, Lieutenant Commanding George H. Ransom.

Schooner Kittatinny, nine guns, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Lamson.

Gun-boat Harriet Lane, six guns, Lieutenant Commanding J. M. Wainwright, with Commander David D. Porter, who has twenty-one schooners, composing "Porter's

mortar fleet," each carrying a heavy mortar and two 32-pound guns.

The fleet thus far, therefore, consists of forty-six sail, carrying two hundred and eighty-six guns, and twenty-one mortars, the whole under command of Flag-Officer D. S. Farragut—Henry H. Bell, Flag Captain.

The Mississippi and the Pensacola grounded on the bar, and were towed off by tugs. The Colorado was unable to cross.

Of the Hartford herself, which is hardly seen with distinctness in our large picture in consequence of her being in the advance of the fleet, we give a separate illustration on this page. She is a noble ship, and Commodore Farragut may well be proud of her.

THE UNITED STATES STEAMER "HARTFORD," COMMODORE FARRAGUT'S FLAG-SHIP, WHICH LED THE SQUADRON UP THE MISSISSIPPI.

Yorktown Cartoon
The Hartford

 

 

  

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