Fortifications of Charleston

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Civil War Art

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 31, 1863

This WEB site features online versions of all the Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These newspapers serve as a resource to allow the serious student to gain new perspective and insights on the War.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Army Beef

Army Beef

War News

War News

Rebel Reaction to Emancipation Proclamation

Beef

Beef

Battle of Vicksburg

Battle of Vicksburg

Emancipated Contrabands

Charleston

Charleston Fortifications

Copperheads

Copperheads

Contrabands

Murfreesboro

Murfreesboro

Galveston

Galveston, Texas

Battle of Galveston

Battle of Galveston

Charleston Blockade

Blockade of Charleston

     
 

 

JANUARY 31, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

79

(Previous Page) They have buried him, since then, beside the grave where he knelt in the moonlight the night before he went away. Only a foot of earth between the two who loved each other so dearly. Is there so much? Surely our dreams of the future are not all in vain. Surely somewhere, in the heaven which is "anchored off this world," where sickness and sorrow never come, and there are neither wars nor rumors of wars, somewhere in that still Land of Peace they are tasting the cup of joy which earth denied them.

John Morgan, and John Morgan's wife and children, will speak the name of Ash Thornycroft all their lives with such reverent tenderness as befits the memory of one who is enshrined in. their hearts as saint and as deliverer. We know not yet for what good end he and those who fell with him laid down their lives—God grant that we may know hereafter—that the seed sown in tears we may reap with exceeding great joy.

MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE.

WE publish on page 69 a view of MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE, now occupied by General Rosecrans, from a sketch by our special artist, Mr. F. Beard. The Times correspondent says of the place:

Murfreesboro is a town which once contained some ten thousand inhabitants, is situated upon a level plain, has two colleges or seminaries—the Baptist Female Institute and the Soule Female College—and an academy for males, six churches, and one hotel.

In the centre of the town is a public square, containing a very handsome court-house. Around this square are the principal business-houses of the place. The streets are wide, and contain many handsome residences. At present the place is entirely deserted by its former residents. It was always strongly rebel in sentiment, and the few citizens who were imbued with Union sentiments have been refugees from home since the retreat of Buell's army. During my stay not a store was open save those taken for the use of Commissary and Quarter-masters' stores. No citizens were upon the streets, nor a woman or child visible —every thing in and about the town is military.

The other picture on the same page illustrates a curious spectacle which met the eyes of our army as they advanced to Murfreesboro. This was a forest of chimneys, which had been erected by the rebels to keep their huts warm, and had been left standing when they decamped. Mr. Beard counted these chimneys by hundreds. They gave a funereal aspect to the place.

THE LOSS OF GALVESTON.

WE publish on pages 72 and 73 two illustrations of the FIGHT AT GALVESTON, TEXAS, on 1st January, from sketches by our special artist in the Gulf. One of them represents the

GUN-BOATS ENGAGED.

The Herald correspondent thus described this scene:

When morning dawned signals were sent up from the flag-ship, which were responded to by all the gun-boats except the Harriet Lane, and now it was that the Commodore first discovered that she had fallen into the hands of the enemy.

The light also revealed the position of the enemy's fleet, and his preparations for an attack from the shore with artillery and riflemen.

It was now determined by the Commodore to retake the Harriet Lane, and he ordered the Owasco to round to and open fire. This gun-boat has an armament of one 11-inch and two 9-inch guns, and she opened with her heaviest.

No sooner had she sent one of her shells than the rebels crowded our prisoners—some of them wounded and dying —upon the deck of the Harriet Lane. They then raised a flag of truce, and paroled and sent the acting master of the Harriet Lane, and her only surviving officer, on board the flag-ship, with a message to Commodore Renshaw to the effect that if another shot was fired upon the Harriet Lane, every Union prisoner would be instantly thrown overboard. In consequence of this message Commodore Renshaw ordered the firing to cease, and made no further attempt to recapture the vessel.

The position of the enemy's fleet was at this time as follows: The two vessels which had accomplished the capture of the Harriet Lane were still lying near that vessel, swarming with sharp-shooters. Two more lay further off toward the bay, while the fifth held herself aloof at a considerable distance. This fifth vessel was reported to be the flag-ship, and, throughout the engagement, was said to have on board the precious carcass of General Magruder, whom the fortunes of war, since the outbreak of the rebellion, have carried from Yorktown to Galveston. But it is probable that General Magruder was on land.

During the morning the enemy opened fire upon our vessels from the shore and the city, of which they were now in full possession. Their sharp-shooters, breaking open the houses along the shore, took possession, and fired from the windows, while the batteries which had been placed in position also opened. They were responded to by our gun-boats, and this mutual exchange of courtesies continued for some time without much effect upon either side.

The rebels had placed two guns upon a point of land inside of and near the entrance to the harbor. The gun-boat Clifton was directed to silence these guns, and performed her work very handsomely. She fired first from her bow gun, then rounded and poured in a broadside; then turned and fired from her gun aft, then rounded again and delivered a broadside. This she did twice, when the enemy's guns were effectually silenced.

TERRIBLE EXPLOSION—DEATH OF COMMODORE RENSHAW.

The flagship Westfield was aground, and a little before ten o'clock in the forenoon the Commodore determined to burn her. The determination resulted in a terrible accident, which cost the Commodore his life. He covered the deck with turpentine, and made all necessary dispositions to insure her burning and had her set on fire. He then got into his boat, with Lieutenant Zimmerman, Chief Engineer William R. Green and two sailors, to proceed to another vessel. But the magazine had been left open, and scarcely had the Commodore and his comrades seated themselves in the boat when a terrible explosion occurred. The magazine, which was stored with ammunition, shells, etc., caught, and half the flagship and the Commodore's boat were scattered through the air in ten thousand fragments. Not one of the unfortunate men on board the vessel at the time or in the boat escaped instantaneous death. It is not known how many perished by this terrible explosion, but the number is estimated at ten to twenty officers and sailors. The explosion left the smoke-stacks standing and the vessel aft unharmed; but what remained was soon burned.

Meantime the rebels were making formidable preparations on shore to prevent the escape of the vessels. They were seen to drag artillery with heavy mule teams to the point commanding the bar, and were busily engaged in planting their batteries and training their guns to prevent the exit of our ships. The transport Mary Boardman, which is rigged precisely like a gun-boat, was lying near the flag-ship at the time of the explosion, and the fate of the Commodore was known only on board this vessel. It was supposed on board the other vessels that the Commodore had gone on board this ship. They therefore signaled

her, asking "What shall we do?" Major Burt, a volunteer aid-de-camp on the staff of Governor Hamilton, told the captain of the vessel that they had no signals with which to reply, but that there was one signal which they could make which he thought would be heeded. He proposed to sail at once, and the captain, agreeing to this, immediately started. This was taken as a signal of retreat, and the Boardman was followed by all the other vessels in our possession. The passage over the bar was exceedingly dangerous, and the vessels were near grounding hopelessly several times; but they all escaped before the enemy had trained his guns sufficiently to do them any harm in crossing. The transports, which had gone to carry supplies to the island, immediately put to sea and returned to this city, the gun-boats remaining behind.

The other picture represents

THE FIGHT ON SHORE,

where the gallant Colonel Burrill with the Massachusetts Forty-second was overpowered by the enemy. A prisoner describing the affair to the Times correspondent spoke in the highest terms of the conduct of the Forty-second Massachusetts. He says they were completely shut in at one end of the wharf, where there was no probability of escape or manoeuvring, and that they fought with the most desperate bravery, although outnumbered at least ten to one. Several times they fairly stemmed the rebel torrent that was rushing down upon them, and the enemy were at last compelled to take them by the bayonet. How many of our gallant fellows were killed he does not say, but he knows that the survivors were taken prisoners to Houston, and that the rebels had twenty-five killed in the struggle.

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.

THE illustrations on page 76 will give the reader some idea of the position of affairs at Charleston, South Carolina, and of fortifications and places of which more may be heard in the course of a day or two. How our illustrations were obtained is a mystery which we do not at present propose to gratify rebel curiosity by revealing. Suffice it to say that, while the rebels have been very active in strengthening their works, our gallant officers have not been idle, and the South Carolinians will probably find, when the tug of battle comes, that we know more of the nature and position of their defenses than they imagine.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

An opportunity that seldom occurs is now afforded those desiring a really handsome and serviceable time-piece at a low price. We are closing out a large importation of the

Improved Sweep-Second Duplex,

in sterling Silver Cases, with English crown work, and superior adjusted movement, with "stop," to be used by sportsmen, artillerists, &c., in marking time. Price, with guarantee, $22. For officers, engineers, and .hers, requiring a really accurate, elegant, and economical watch, this fills a desideratum long felt. Will be sent by Express with bill for collection. Persons ordering in this manner must remit Two Dollars as a guarantee that the bill will be paid. Address

HUBBARD BROS., IMPORTERS, Cor. John and Nassau Streets, New York.

THIS DAY PUBLISHED

AN IMPORTANT MILITARY WORK.

ELEMENTS OF MILITARY ART AND HISTORY.

Comprising the History of the Tactics of the separate Arms, the Combination of the Arms, and the minor operations of war. By Edward de la Barre Duparcp, Captain of Engineers, and Professor of the Military Art in the Imperial School of Saint Cyr. Translated by Brig.-Gen. George W. Cullum, U.S.A., Chief of the Staff of Maj.-Gen. H. W. Halleck, U.S.A. 1 vol. 8vo, cloth, with illustrations. Price $4. D. VAN NOSTRAND, Publisher, No. 192 Broadway, N. Y.

Milligan's Patent Mess Kettle.

Arranged for four Officers, weight 15 pounds, price, $12, AND

Weight 9 1/2 pounds, price $6.00. Sold by Dealers in Military Goods throughout the country. Wholesale Depot, No. 4 Platt Street,' Street, New York.

Send for Circulars.   MILLIGAN BROS.

DO YOU WANT LUXURIANT WHISKERS OR MUSTACHES?—My Onguent will force them to grow heavily in six weeks (upon the smoothest face) without stain or injury to the skin. Price $1—sent by mail, post free, to any address, on receipt of an order. R. G. GRAHAM, No. 109 Nassau Street, N. Y.

Portable Printing Offices,

For the use of Merchants, Druggists, and all who wish to do their own Printing. Circular sent free. Specimen Sheets of Type, Cuts, &c., on receipt of two 3 ct. stamps.

ADAMS PRESS CO., 31 Park Row, N. Y.

Rheumatism—Who has it?

It has been confessedly acknowledged by thousands who have used them, that the Galvano Electra Metallic Insoles are the only preventive and cure. Sold by all druggists and shoe dealers generally. Price $1; sent by mail for $1.25. Secured by English and American Patents.

Send for a circular. METTAM & CO., 429 Broadway.

Pensions, Bounty, Pay, Prize

Money, and all Army and Navy Claims, promptly collected. Reliable information furnished, sales of claims negotiated upon the best terms, and accounts cashed. A pamphlet of Laws and Instructions sent by enclosing a one-cent stamp to pay postage.

SOMES & BROWN, 2 Park Place, N. Y.

J. H. Winslow Co.
THE GREATEST OPPORTUNITY EVER OFFERED
TO SECURE GOOD JEWELRY AT LOW
PRICES.

100,000

WATCHES, CHAINS, SETS OF JEWELRY, GOLD PENS, BRACELETS, LOCKETS, RINGS, GENTS' PINS, SLEEVE-BUTTONS, STUDS, ETC., ETC., ETC.,

Worth $500,000

To be sold for One Dollar each, without regard to value, and not to be paid for till you know what you are to get. Send 25 cents for a Certificate, which will inform you what you can have for $1, and at the same time get our Circular containing full list and particulars, also terms to Agents, which we want in every Regiment and Town in the country. J. H. WINSLOW & CO., 208 Broadway, New York.

Fine Sleeve and Bosom Studs.

Sleeve and Bosom Studs made of the finest Ivory, brought to a high polish, of all colors, and engraved with Initial Letter, Old English, &c. Monograms to order. Free by mail on receipt of price. Sets, $1.50. Trade supplied.

   JOHN F. PHELPS, 429 Broadway, N. Y.

"MOUSTACHES AND WHISKERS IN 42 DAYS," Hunting, Fishing, and many other Great Secrets, all in the Book of Wonders. 8,000 sold. 9th Ed. Price only 20c. 8 for $1. Mailed free. Address

HUNTER & CO., Hinsdale, N. H.

AND ARMS. Selpho's Patent. 516 Broadway, N. Y., Opposite St. Nicholas Hotel. Send for a Circular.

CATARRH!—Dr. Goodale's CATARRH REMEDY penetrates to the very seat of this terrible disease, and exterminates it, root and branch. Price $1.00. Send a stamp for a pamphlet. Depot 612 Broadway.

Army Musical Boxes!

A BEAUTIFUL PARLOR ORNAMENT!

A Cheerful Companion for the Soldier!

Richly ornamented, and performing all the popular Airs of the day. Can not get out of order.

Size No. 1, per half dozen, assorted .....$30.

Size No. 2, per half dozen, assorted ......42.

Size No. 3, per half dozen, assorted ......54.

Samples, comprising 2 of each kind, assorted .....42.

To Sutlers and other Dealers:

When a dozen or more are ordered, a discount of 10 per cent. will be made. NOT SOLD IN QUANTITIES OF LESS THAN SIX. Will be sent by Express, with bill for collection. Persons ordering in this manner, must remit one quarter of the bill as a guarantee that the goods will be paid for, or deposit the whole amount with the Express Agent, sending a certificate of the same. These rules will not be deviated from under any circumstances. Order explicitly.

SAMUEL F. SCHAFFER & CO., Corner Maiden Lane and Broadway, New York.

INVENTORS SHOULD PROCURE A Copy of "HOW TO GET A PATENT." Send a 3 cent stamp to FOWLER AND WELLS, New York.

SOMETHING NEW.

NATIONAL AMERICAN AMUSEMENT CARDS. Colonel for King, Goddess of Liberty for Queen, and Major for Jack. 52 enameled cards to the pack. Eagles, Shields, Stars, and Flags are the suits, and you can play all the usual games. Four packs mailed free on receipt of One Dollar The usual discount to the trade. Send for a Circular. Address AMERICAN PUBLISHING AGENCY,

   14 Chambers Street, New York.

$60 A MONTH! We want Agents at $60 a month, expenses paid, to sell our Everlasting Pencils, Oriental Burners, and 13 other new articles. 15 circulars free. Address, SHAW & CLARK, Biddeford, Me.

These Celebrated Engraved Cards sold only at J. EVERDELL'S
Old Establishment, 302 Broadway, cor. Duane St., N.Y.
Established 1840. For Specimen by Mail, send two stamps.

FRIENDS OF SOLDIERS!

All Articles for Soldiers at Baltimore, Washington, Hilton Head, Newbern, and all places occupied by Union troops, should be sent, at half rates, by HARNDEN'S EXPRESS, No. 74 Broadway. Sutlers charged low rates.

LONDON LANCET for JANUARY is now issued.—Articles of the first eminence, including two on the Health and Surgery of the American Armies.

Publishing Office, H. DEXTER, No. 113 Nassau Street.

      JAS. HERALD, Proprietor.

To all Wanting Farms.

Large and thriving settlement of Vineland. Rich soil. Good crops of Wheat, Corn, Peaches, &c., to be seen—only 30 miles from Philadelphia. Delightful climate—20 acre tracts of from $15 to $20 per acre, payable within 4 years. Good schools and society. Hundreds are settling. Apply to CHAS. K. LANDIS, P.M., Vineland, Cumberland Co., New Jersey. Report of Solon Robinson and Vineland Rural sent free. From Report of Solon Robinson, Ag. Ed. Tribune.

"It is one of the most extensive fertile tracts, in an almost level position, and suitable condition for pleasant farming that we know of this side of the Western Prairies.  

To the Nervous.
Dr. Adam Laurie's Life Pills,

The great Nervous Remedy, are for sale at the Sole
Agency, No. 4 Union Square, New York.
Price One Dollar per box, with full directions.
All letters with enclosures must be addressed as above.

$75 A MONTH! I want to hire Agents in every county at $75 a month, expenses paid, to sell my new cheap Family Sewing Machines. Address,

S. MADISON, Alfred, Maine.

India-Rubber Gloves cure Chapped Hands, Salt Rheum, &c., and render them soft, smooth, and snowy white; are impervious to water either hot or cold, and are an excellent protection in all kinds of house-work. For sale by the trade generally. Sent by mail on receipt of price and 4 stamps to pay postage. Ladies' sizes 87 c. a pair; Gents sizes, $1.00. GOODYEAR'S I. R. GLOVE M'F'G CO., 205 Broadway, N. Y. Every description of Rubber Goods, Wholesale and Retail.

Meerschaum.

POLLAK & SON, manufacturers of Meerschaum Pipes at 357 Broome Street, near Bowery, New York, have always on hand a well-assorted stock of Meerschaum Pipes, Tubes, &c., at the lowest prices. They import the raw meerschaum from Smyrna, and manufacture to order. City and out of town orders solicited, and they will be served to the best. Repairing neatly done.

HARPER'S
NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE
For February, 1863.

CONTENTS:

A CALIFORNIAN IN ICELAND: SECOND PAPER.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—The Capital of Iceland.—Church at Rvykjavik.—Governor's Residence.—Icelandic Houses.—Icelanders at Work.—Geir Zoega.—Icelandic Horses.—English Party. —A rough Road.—Taking Snuff.—Icelandic Bog.—Geir Zoega and Brusa.—Entrance to the Almannajau.—The Almannajau.—Skeleton View of the Almannajau.—Outline View of Thingvalla.—Fall of the Almannajau.—Icelandic Shepherd-Girl.—Church at Thingvalla.—The Pastor's House.—The Pastor of Thingvalla.—Thingvalla, the Logberg, and the Almannajau.—Skeleton View of the Logberg.—Diagram of the Loglerg.

DOCTOR HAWLEY. PART I.

ILLUSTRATIONS. — The Doctor and his Daughter. — Uncle and Nephew.—Husband and Wife. —In full Costume.

ROMOLA. By the Author of "ADAM BEDE."

CHAPTER XXVII. The Young Wife.

CHAPTER XXVIII. The Painted Record.

CHAPTER XXIX. A Moment of Triumph.

CHAPTER XXX. The Avenger's Secret.

CHAPTER XXXI. Fruit is Seed.

CHAPTER XXXII. A Revelation.

ILLUSTRATIONS. — Waiting. — Coming Home. — The Painted Record.

PHILIP RAYNOR'S SACRIFICE.

A TILT AT THE WOMAN'S QUESTION. THOMAS ELLIOTT'S SPECULATIONS. GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS.

JUMPING JACK'S DAUGHTER.

THE RAREY METHOD.

UP TO THE HILLS.

THE SMALL HOUSE AT ALLINGTON.

CHAPTER XIII. A Visit to Guestwick.

CHAPTER XIV. John Eames takes a Walk.

CHAPTER XV. The last Day.

ILLUSTRATIONS. — Hobbies. — "Why, it's young Eames!"

THE GUN-BOAT ESSEX.

THE POLICEMAN'S CHRISTMAS TRAMP. MONTHLY RECORD OF CURRENT EVENTS. EDITOR'S TABLE.

EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR.

EDITOR'S DRAWER.

ILLUSTRATION.—On the Pond.

THE DEAD DRUMMER-BOY.—Illustrated. FASHIONS FOR FEBRUARY.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Lady and Child's Street Dress.—Negligee Robe.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year ........................$3.00

Two Copies for One Year ......................5.00
An Extra Copy, gratis, for every Club of TEN SUBSCRIBERS, at $2.50 each, or 11 Copies for $25.00.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $5.00.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS.

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

Single Copies Six Cents.

TERMS.

One Copy for One Year .....................$3.00

One Copy for Two Years .....................5.00

And an Extra Copy will be allowed for every Club of TEN SUBSCRIBERS, at $2.50 each, or 11 Copies for $25.

The Publishers employ no TRAVELING AGENTS. Parties who desire to subscribe to Harper's Magazine or Harper's Weekly had better remit direct to the Publishers, or pay their subscription to some Postmaster or General Agent with whom they are acquainted, and of whose responsibility they are assured.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

   FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

HARPER & BROTHERS

FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK,

Have Just Published:

NO NAME. A Novel. By WILKIE COLLINS, Author of "The Woman in White," "Queen of Hearts," &c. Illustrated by JOHN MCLENAN. 8vo, Paper, $1.25; Cloth, $1.50.

MY DIARY NORTH AND SOUTH. By WILLIAM HOWARD RUSSELL. 8vo, Cloth and Paper. (Just Ready.)

BARRINGTON. A Novel. By CHAS. LEVER, Author of "Charles O'Malley," "Gerald Fitzgerald," "The Martins of Cro' Martin," "Maurice Tiernay," "The Dodd Family Abroad," "One of Them," &c., &c., &c. 8vo, Paper, 50 cents.

AURORA FLOYD. A Novel. By M. E. BRADDON, Author of "Lady Audley's Secret." 8vo, Paper, 25 cents.

THE STUDENT'S HISTORY OF FRANCE. A History of France from the Earliest Times to the Establishment of the Second Empire in 1852. Illustrated by Engravings on Wood. Large 12mo (Uniform with The Student's Hume," "The Student's Gibbon," "Student's Greece," "Liddell's Rome," &c.), Cloth, $1.25.

MODERN WAR: Its Theory and Practice. Illustrated from Celebrated Campaigns and Battles. With Maps and Diagrams. By EMERIC SZABAD, Captain U. S. A. 12mo, Cloth, $1.25.

SPRINGS OF ACTION. By Mrs. C. H. B. RICHARDS. 12mo, printed on Tinted Paper, Cloth, $1.00; Cloth, Gilt Edges, $1.25.

MEMOIRS OF MRS. JOANNA BETHUNE. By her Son, the Rev. GEo. W. BETHUNE, D.D. With an Appendix, containing Extracts from the Writings of Mrs. Bethune, 12mo, Cloth, $1.00.

LINES LEFT OUT. By the Author of "Line upon Line," "Streaks of Light," "More about Jesus," "Reading without Tears." With 28 Illustrations. 16mo, Cloth gilt, 75 cents.

GENERAL BUTTERFIELD'S OUTPOST DUTY. Camp and Outpost Duty for Infantry. With Standing Orders, Extracts from the Revised Regulations for the Army, Rules for Health, Maxims for Soldiers, and Duties of Officers. By DANIEL BUTTERFIELD, Brig.-Gen. Vols., U.S.A. 18mo, Flexible Cloth, 63 cents.

MISTRESS AND MAID. A HOUSEHOLD STORY. By DINAH MARIA MULOCK, Author of "John Halifax, Gentleman," "Olive," "The Ogilvies," "The Head of the Family," "Agatha's Husband," "A Life for a Life," &c., &c. 8vo, Paper, 50 cents.

ORLEY FARM. A Novel. By ANTHONY TROI.I.OPE, Author of "North America," "Doctor Thorne," "Framley Parsonage," "The Bertrams," "Castle Richmond," "TheWest Indies and the Spanish Main," "The Three Clerks," &c., &c. Illustrated by J. E. MILLAIS. 8vo, Paper, $1.25; Cloth, $1.56. Sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt of price.

Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture
Picture

 

 

 

Site Copyright 2003-2013 Son of the South. For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

privacy policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.