Fort McHenry

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 13, 1861

This newspaper features some really nice portraits of General Winfield Scott, and has pictures and a story on the Battle of Boonville. It also has a great picture of Abraham Lincoln's cabinet at the start of the war.

(Scroll Down to see entire newspaper page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

The Battle of Boonville

The Battle of Boonville

General Lyon Biography

Texas

Texas Union Movement

Fort McHenry

Fort McHenry

General Winfield Scott

General Scott

Portrait of General Scott

Lincoln Cabinet

Abraham Lincoln's Cabinet

Colorado

Civil War Ship "Colorado"

Philadelphia Volunteers

Philadelphia Volunteers

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati, Ohio

Slave Auction

Slave Auction

John C. Fremont

General John Fremont

White Springs

White Springs, Virginia

Description of a Slave Auction

Acne

Acne Treatment

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JULY 13, 1861.

436

Columbiad pointing to City of Baltimore.

Columbiad covering Washington Monument.

FORT McHENRY, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.—DRAWN BY A MEMBER OF COMPANY D, 3D RIFLES, M. V.

FORT McHENRY AND MARSHAL
KANE.

ON 27th June General Banks astonished the people of the rebellious city of Baltimore by arresting Marshal Kane at 3 A.M., and marching him under guard of a file of soldiers to Fort McHenry. Of his traitorous proceedings no doubt is entertained, and every one applauds General Banks's vigorous course. We publish on page 445, in illustration of the event, a portrait of MARSHAL KANE, from a recent photograph ; and on this page a view of FORT McHENRY, lately sent us by

a member of Company D, 3d Rifles, M. V. It is an extremely strong fort, and the Columbiads which are now placed in position command the city thoroughly.

Mr. Raymond, of the Times, thus describes Fort McHenry at the present time :

Fort M'Henry is now in very good condition to resist any assault. When the Baltimore riot occurred, as was very fully explained soon after in a letter from the fort to the Times, it was in a very bad condition, and could scarcely have resisted a vigorous assault. It is a small work, of the old style, surrounded by a dry ditch, and scarcely provided with any defenses on the landward side, from which, when it was built, an attack was never contemplated.

But now, thanks to the energy of Major Morris, of the regular army, who has been for some time its commandant, it may defy attack from any quarter. Barricades have been erected to guard the entrance. An abattis of trees, with projecting branches, has been erected around the fort. Several platforms have been extemporized under the curtain originally intended only to shelter infantry. Sand-bag guards have been placed over the door and window of the magazine. Gutters have been provided to roll hand-grenades upon the heads of an assailing force. Fresh guns have been mounted, and I observed that all the mortars and a part of the Columbiads on the landward side are kept loaded—in preparation for any emergency. Fort McHenry is about two miles from the centre of the city, and it is well understood that it could drop shells, hot or otherwise, into all the houses in the infected district with the utmost ease. I trust the

necessity for so doing may never arise ; but it is consoling to know that, if it does, it can be promptly met.

A correspondent of the Herald says :

The "unconstitutional" examination of Marshal Kane's premises, since his arrest in Baltimore, has brought to light some curious pieces of personal property, an enumeration of which may be of some interest to the public. Here are the articles :

Cannon, four and six pounders, 6; assorted shot, lbs., 3000; shell, lbs., 1000; shot for steam guns, lbs., 300; muskets, 663 ; carbines, 48; rifles, 43; double-barreled shot-guns, 3; single-barreled shot-guns, 8 ; horse pistols, 9; small pistols, 65; bullet moulds, 132 ; cartridge-boxes, 3; dirk-knives, 8; swords, 5; drums, 8; gum coats, 33; powder-flasks, 64 ; canisters, 117; cartridges, 40,000 ; canisters of shot, 7; besides a lot of screw-drivers, etc.

VIRGINIA TROOPS CROSSING THE BLUE RIDGE AT DAYBREAK, EN ROUTE FOR MANASSAS JUNCTION.-[SEE PAGE 443.]

Fort McHenry
Virginia Troops

 

 

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