Pictures of Harpers Ferry

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 20, 1861

This Civil War newspaper shows nice eye-witness illustrations showing Harper's Ferry, The Brooklyn Navy-Yard, and Pirates. There is news of the day, as well as a description of the Battle of Martinsburg.

(Scroll Down to see full page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Arsenal

Civil War Arsenal

Theodore Davis

Theodore R. Davis

The Battle of Martinsburg

Eleventh Indiana Regiment

Eleventh Indiana Regiment

Hagerstown, Maryland

Hagerstown, Maryland

Harper's Ferry

Harper's Ferry

Camp Life

Civil War Camp Life

Pirates

Pirates

Brooklyn Navy Yard

The Brooklyn Navy-yard

Broadway, New York

Speaker Grow

Speaker Grow

Washington Map

Washington Map

General Patterson

General Patterson

Slavery Cartoon

Slavery Cartoon

 

 

 

JULY 20, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

455

STOCKADE AND CAMP OF THE KENTUCKY REGIMENT (REBEL), ON THE MARYLAND HEIGHTS, OPPOSITE HARPER'S FERRY.

VIEW OF HAGERSTOWN.—PHILADELPHIA RANGERS.

ON page 454 will be found a picture, from a drawing by our special artist, now with General Patterson's division, giving a view of Hagerstown as seen from head-quarters, together with a fine group of McMullin's Philadelphia Rangers in the fore-ground. The Rangers number a full company, and are encamped near head-quarters as a body-guard to General Patterson. They are the pets of this portion of the army, and have already earned for themselves an enviable reputation by their valuable and daring services to the Government as scouts. Their quiet deportment and unassuming air have won for the Rangers a host of friends among the Pennsylvanians and Marylanders with whom they have thus far sojourned. Captain M'Mullin himself served valiantly in the Mexican war, as did also many of those now under his experienced command. He is a good soldier and an exceedingly popular officer.

Hagerstown is a city of about 4500 inhabitants, contains seven churches and three banks, and is the depot for an extensive grain-growing country. Its site is very beautiful, being in the heart of the Cumberland Valley. On either side run the North and South Mountains, about twenty-five miles apart, and along the eastern limits of the place courses a charming rivulet, the Antietam. Washington County, of which Hagerstown is the chief mart, was organized in 1776. Elizabethtown was the name given to the original settlement, but this was changed to its present title by act of Legislature about the year 1813, out of compliment to Christian Hager, a prominent citizen. A corporation charter was also obtained at the same time, and a Moderator and Commissioners formed the officers of the city government. A new charter in 1846 provided for the election of a Mayor and Common Council.

Many delightful drives are to be found around the city, and many elegant residences. Among the more prominent public buildings depicted in our sketch are the Lutheran and Dutch Reformed churches, the Market, and the Washington House. The latter is a surprisingly fine hotel for so small a place, being large, handsome, and well kept. An

DESTRUCTION OF RAILWAY CARS AT HARPER'S FERRY BY THE MISSISSIPPIANS.

unwonted prominence has lately been given to Hagerstown by reason of its being selected as the head-quarters of the "Military Department of Pennsylvania," over which Major-General Patterson presides.

HARPER'S FERRY.

WE publish on this page some engravings of scenes at Harper's Ferry which illustrate the condition in which the rebels have left that romantic spot.

Two of our pictures represent THE DESTRUCTION OF LOCOMOTIVES ON THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD. No less than fifty of the finest locomotives on the road have been destroyed at Martinsburg and other points. The engine represented in our picture was brought up from the Maryland side of the Potomac ; the day before the destruction of the bridge it was left standing on the Winchester road, and a few days after the retreat a detachment of rebels returned to the Ferry and ran it off the end of the ruined bridge into the river, where it now lies in the position depicted in the sketch.

The sketch of the ARMORY was made from the upper end of the Armory yard, looking down. It shows a portion of the works, but they all look alike now, all in ruins, every vestige of wood-work destroyed. A settled melancholy now hangs over the place with its long lines of blackened walls and deserted, lonely appearance.

The KENTUCKY REGIMENT, Colonel Duncan, whose camp we illustrate, recently composed part of General Johnston's command at Harper's Ferry. They occupied the Heights on. the Maryland side of the river. Their principal camp, about a mile from the Ferry, numbered some fifty or sixty log cabins, laid off in streets, having the appearance of quite a town. The fort or stockade is just behind the camp, facing north ; it is made of a double row of logs set endwise in the ground. It is loop-holed for the use of musketry, and might prove a very good protection from a bullet, but would stand no chance at all from the fire of a six-pounder. They left it unfinished in their retreat.

LOCOMOTIVE AND TENDER THROWN FROM THE RAILWAY BRIDGE AT HARPER'S FERRY BY
THE REBELS.

HARPER'S FERRY ARMORY AS IT NOW APPEARS.

Maryland Heights
Harper's Ferry Railroad
Harper's Ferry Railroad Bridge
Harper's Ferry Armory

 

 

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