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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 4, 1862

This site features all the original Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These newspapers are full of incredible illustrations and first hand stories of the War. Harper's Weekly was the most popular illustrated newspaper of the day.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

McClellan in Frederick, Maryland

McClellan in Frederick, Maryland

Abolition of Slavery

Abolition of Slavery

Emancipation Proclamation

Emancipation Proclamation

General Franklin

General Franklin

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Iuka

Battle of Iuka, Mississippi

Market House, Cincinnati

The Market House, Cincinnati

Maryland Heights

Maryland Heights

Kentucky Battle Map

Kentucky Battle Map

Antietam

Antietam

Slave Cartoon

Slave Cartoon

 

 

 

OCTOBER 4, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

631

THE CAPITOL GROUNDS AT HARRISBURG TURNED INTO A CAMP.—[SKETCHED BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

AT HARRISBURG.

MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS sends us a couple of sketches from Harrisburg, which we reproduce on this page. They explain themselves. In the memory of the oldest inhabitant Harrisburg has never known such an excitement as the one which it has lately experienced. In the language of every visitor, words fail to describe the martial enthusiasm

of the Pennsylvanians, or the almost countless throngs of soldiers who have filed through the State capital to take part in the defense of their State against the invader. Governor Curtin reports 75,000 Pennsylvanians under arms.

A Times correspondent says:

Recruits are constantly arriving here. From early dawn yesterday until quite late at night, every train was bringing in its patriotic freight, until we now have troops from every county in the State. Camp Curtin is crowded to

overflowing; the beautiful grounds of the Capitol is one vast encampment covered with tents; the Senate and House of Representatives turned into a barracks, as well as every other room in the Capitol not immediately required for executive purposes; the Court-house is also appropriated to the soldiers, and, indeed, every available place has been seized upon as a war "depot;" the private houses, in the mean time, opening their doors to and lavishing their hospitality upon all the brave boys who choose to partake.

There are individual companies already here from Pittsburg

and other places, each of which represents a business capital of some millions of dollars. Judges, preachers, physicians, merchants, lawyers, artists, and men of every other profession, are found side by side with the brawny and honest sons of physical labor, shouldering the musket. Here is to be seen a learned Judge in the ranks, commanded by one of his own peers—there a Preacher-Captain, instructing his flock how to do battle; and there again, some merchant or boss-mechanic, led on by one who was but yesterday their poor clerk or dependent. It is romance and poetry of the highest order, simmered down to the vulgar level of everyday life.

THE RAILWAY DEPOT AT HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA—ARRIVAL OF TROOPS.—[SKETCHED BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

Harrisburg Capitol
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

 

 

  

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